Ohagi (to freeze-store for later)

Hey everyone, it is Louise, welcome to my recipe page. Today, we’re going to prepare a special dish, ohagi (to freeze-store for later). One of my favorites. This time, I am going to make it a little bit unique. This is gonna smell and look delicious.

Ohagi (to freeze-store for later) is one of the most popular of current trending foods in the world. It is easy, it is fast, it tastes delicious. It’s appreciated by millions every day. They are fine and they look fantastic. Ohagi (to freeze-store for later) is something that I’ve loved my whole life.

Wash the sticky and plain rice together. When you're ready to eat, defrost overnight in the refrigerator. To bring back the ideal texture, Ohagi Ohagi (Botamochi) are not so sweet and they go really well with green tea. Even though I don't observe the religious ceremony, I still make these for.

To begin with this particular recipe, we must prepare a few ingredients. You can have ohagi (to freeze-store for later) using 12 ingredients and 16 steps. Here is how you can achieve that.

The ingredients needed to make Ohagi (to freeze-store for later):
  1. Get 1 raw rice : 1 12 rice cooker cup Sticky rice
  2. Take 1 raw rice : 12 rice cooker cup Plain rice
  3. Take 1 tsp Sugar
  4. Get 50 ml Salt water
  5. Take Red bean ohagi
  6. Get 400 grams Powdered koshi-an
  7. Get 120 grams Sugar
  8. Make ready 1 pinch Salt
  9. Take Kinako ohagi
  10. Make ready 3 tbsp Kinako
  11. Get 3 tbsp Sugar
  12. Get 1 pinch Salt

Recursively freezes the current state, the dispatched action payload if provided and the new state. When mutation occurs, an exception will be thrown. Should be used only in development to ensure that the state remains immutable. This ohagi recipe provides instructions for making traditional Japanese desserts/sweets out of azuki red beans and mochi rice cakes.

Steps to make Ohagi (to freeze-store for later):
  1. Wash the sticky and plain rice together.
  2. Let soak in water for 1 hour.
  3. Once it's done soaking, move the rice to a rice cooker bowl, stir in the sugar, and fill water to the "white rice" line. Adding sugar prevents the sticky rice from becoming too hard.
  4. While the rice is cooking, prepare the anko. I used this particular powdered koshi-an this time.
  5. Combine the anko with the amount of water indicated on the package, add sugar, and heat. It will be fairly gooey at first.
  6. Cook until it's the desired thickness.
  7. Now prepare the kinako. The kinako-sugar ratio is 1:1, so prepare as much as you like to make. I made 3 tablespoons this time.
  8. Once the rice is finished, let steam for 10 minutes. Dip a rolling pin or similar rod damped with salt water to slightly mash the rice.
  9. Moisten a paper towel and wring out excess water. If you don't have paper towels, use cling wrap or a tightly wrung towel.
  10. Spread bean paste on the paper towel and place the rice on top. Grab enough rice for one ohagi from the rice cooker and cover the rest when not in use.
  11. You can eyeball the amount of bean paste and rice. It should look something like this.
  12. Use your fingers to gently stretch the bean paste completely around the rice.
  13. If the paper towel gets particularly dirty, wash, wring it out, and use it again.
  14. Since the kinako is just for sprinkling on the outside of the ohagi, they will end up slightly smaller than the ones wrapped in bean paste, so add a bit more rice to make the sizes similar.
  15. Wrap extra ohagi in cling wrap to prevent drying and freeze.
  16. These are covered in kinako, but when you defrost the ohagi, the kinako tends to melt, so I recommend defrosting first, then covering with kinako.

Should be used only in development to ensure that the state remains immutable. This ohagi recipe provides instructions for making traditional Japanese desserts/sweets out of azuki red beans and mochi rice cakes. Commonly enjoyed in Japan during the autumn equinox or during O-bon (a festival for honouring the spirits of one's ancestors), ohagi are made with glutinous mochi rice. Japanese artist Ohagi truly lives the "Kawaii" cartoon style. Learn how she draws her cute characters.

So that’s going to wrap it up with this special food ohagi (to freeze-store for later) recipe. Thank you very much for reading. I am sure you can make this at home. There’s gonna be interesting food at home recipes coming up. Don’t forget to bookmark this page on your browser, and share it to your loved ones, friends and colleague. Thanks again for reading. Go on get cooking!